The MMR vaccine

What is the MMR vaccine?

The MMR vaccine - or the Measles, Mumps and Rubella vaccine - is a three-in-one vaccine that helps prevents recipients from contracting the three diseases for which it is named.


What is measles?

The measles is a highly contagious disease spread through sneezing and coughing. You can contract measles from an infected person not covering up while they sneeze or coughing while near you, or from touching something that has the virus on it and then touching your mouth or nose.


If you know someone who has measles, it is best to avoid seeing them until they have recovered.


Signs and symptoms of measles include:

  • fever

  • red rash

  • runny nose

  • fatigue

  • dry cough

  • conjunctivitis


Measles can be quite dangerous as it often leads to other serious illnesses, such as:

  • an airway infection such as pneumonia

  • middle ear infections

  • encephalitis, which is the swelling of the brain

  • adverse outcomes for pregnant women and their unborn babies

  • and in serious cases, death.


If you suspect you have measles, contact your doctor and avoid as many people and public places as possible. When booking your appointment, be sure to advise that you think you have the measles as some precautions may need to be taken.


According to the Australian Government Department of Health “Measles is so contagious that around 9 out of 10 people who come in contact with the virus and are not immunised will get measles.”

What is mumps?

Like the measles, mumps is a highly infectious disease. You can contract the mumps from someone who has it, but you can prevent it with the MMR vaccine.


Signs and symptoms of mumps include:

  • tiredness

  • headaches

  • high fever

  • surpassed appetite

  • swelling of the face

  • pain when swallowing or chewing


If you know someone who has the mumps, it is best to avoid seeing them until they have recovered.


Mumps can also lead to serious illnesses, such as:

  • Swelling of the brain

  • Infertility

  • Meningitis

  • Myocarditis

  • Miscarriage for women in their first trimester

  • Nerve damage which can cause deafness


If you suspect you have mumps, contact your doctor and avoid as many people and public places as possible. When booking your appointment, be sure to advise that you think you have the mumps as some precautions may need to be taken.


What is rubella?

Rubella, also known as the German measles, is a very contagious disease that is spread through the coughs or sneezes of an infected person. Pregnant women who have rubella can pass it to their unborn babies.


Signs and symptoms of rubella include:

  • conjunctivitis

  • rash

  • fever

  • runny nose

  • joint pain

  • swollen glands


Rubella is particularly dangerous for pregnant women as it can cause babies to be born:

  • deaf

  • with heart problems

  • blind

  • with brain damage

  • with problems with their growth

  • with lung, liver or brain swelling


If you suspect you have rubella, contact your doctor and avoid as many people and public places as possible. When booking your appointment, be sure to advise that you think you have rubella as some precautions may need to be taken.


Is the MMR vaccine necessary?

Yes, all children should receive two doses of the vaccine, generally at the ages of 12 months and 18 months.


Adults who haven’t had the vaccine should schedule an appointment with their doctors to discuss. Please see below for information on who qualifies for a free MMR vaccine.


Who should get the MMR vaccine?

Anyone who hasn’t received the vaccination and is eligible health-wise should receive the vaccine.


It is standard procedure for infants to receive two doses of the vaccines mentioned above.


Who shouldn’t receive the MMR vaccine?

Pregnant women and those who are immunosuppressed shouldn’t receive the MMR vaccine. You can discuss further with your doctor if you are not sure if you are immunosuppressed.


Who is eligible for a free MMR vaccine?

Those eligible for a free MMR vaccine are:

  • Any adult that was born during or after the year 1966 and doesn’t have evidence of receiving the vaccine.Babies aged six months to less than eleven months old who are travelling overseas.Infants who are scheduled for two doses of the vaccine at ages 12 months and 18 months.

  • Before receiving the injection, your doctor will discuss all possible side effects with you, and what to do if these side-effects should occur.


If you'd like to book an appointment for you or your children to receive the MMR vaccine at The Clinic, then please call us on 9741 1200 or book an appointment online.

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 Werribee VIC 3030

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